I love Lee

Lee County Historical Markers VA-Z130 Lee County Lee County, the western-most county in Virginia, was formed from Russell County in 1792; a part of Scott County was added later. The county is named for Henry Light-Horse Harry Lee, governor of Virginia from 1791 to 1794 and former American Revolutionary War officer. Cumberland Gap National Historic Park lies partly in Lee County and in the states of Kentucky and Tennessee. The Cumberland Gap was the principal route through the mountains that Native Americans and early European settlers used to travel to the west and the south. The county seat is Jonesville...Department of Historic Resources, 2003 Location: US Hwy 23, about 4 miles north of intersection with US Hwy 58 at the Wise and Lee county line GPS Location: 36.7608599290, -82.8186661890 VA-Z97 Lee County Area 446 Square Miles. Formed in 1792 from Russell, and named for Henry (Light-Horse Harry) Lee, Revolutionary soldier and Governor of Virginia, 1791-1794. Daniel Boone's son was killed by Indians here..Conservation & Development Commission, 1928 Location: US Hwy 58/421 at the Scott and Lee county line GPS Location: VA-K32 Death of Boone's Son In this valley, on 10 Oct. 1773, Delaware, Shawnee, and Cherokee Indians killed Daniel Boone's eldest son, James, and five others in their group of eight settlers en route to Kentucky. Separated from Daniel Boone's main party, the men had set up camp near Wallen's Creek. At dawn the Indians attacked and killed James Boone, Henry Russell, John and Richard Mendenhall (brothers), a youth whose last name was Drake, and Charles (one of two slaves in the party). Isaac Crabtree and Adam, a slave, escaped. This event prompted Boone and his party to abandon their first attempt to settle Kentucky..Department of Historic Resources, 2000 US Hwy 58/421, Stickleyville VA-K5 Fanny Dickenson Scott Johnson Fanny Dickenson Scott Johnson.In this valley in June 1785, Fanny Dickenson Scott's husband, Archibald Scott, their four children and a young male member of the nearby Ball family were killed by members of four different Indian tribes. The rest of the Ball family escaped, but Fanny Scott was taken prisoner. She later was able to flee her captors. After evading Indians and enduring many hardships, she reached the New Garden settlement in present day Russell County by 11 August. Newspapers as far as away as Philadelphia reported her ordeal. She later married Thomas Johnson for whom Johnson County, Tennessee is named. She died in May 1796 in Russell County..Department of Historic Resources, 2000 US Hwy 58/421, Stickleyville VA-K1 Cumberland Gap The pass was long the gateway to the west. On April 13, 1750, Dr. Thomas Walker reached the gap, which he named for the Duke of Cumberland, son of George II. A few years later Daniel Boone and numberless pioneers passed through it on the way to Kentucky. In August, 1863, Cumberland Gap was captured by a Union Army under General Ambrose E. Burnside...Conservation & Development Commission 1929 US 58 (westbound) near the Tennessee-Virginia state line VA-Z130 Lee County Lee County, the western-most county in Virginia, was formed from Russell County in 1792; a part of Scott County was added later. The county is named for Henry Light-Horse Harry Lee, governor of Virginia from 1791 to 1794 and former American Revolutionary War officer. Cumberland Gap National Historic Park lies partly in Lee County and in the states of Kentucky and Tennessee. The Cumberland Gap was the principal route through the mountains that Native Americans and early European settlers used to travel to the west and the south. The county seat is Jonesville...Department of Historic Resources, 2003 US 58 at the Virginia - Tennessee state line VA-K10 Jonesville This town was established in 1794 as the county seat of Lee County and was named for Frederick Jones. Here on January 3, 1864, General William E. Jones, assisted by Colonel A. L. Pridemore, defeated a Union force, capturing the battalion. Union troops burned the courthouse in 1864. The present courthouse was erected in 1933. The town was incorporated in 1834, and reincorporated in 1901..Virginia Conservation Commission, 1941 Main Street, Jonesville VA-K8 Doctor Still's Birthplace Andrew Taylor Still, physician and founder of osteopathy, was born two miles southwest, near the Natural Bridge of Lee County, August 6, 1828. Dr. Still served in the War between the States. He established the first American school of osteopathy in 1892 at Kirksville, Missouri. He died there, December 12, 1917..Virginia Conservation Commission, 1939 Main Street, Jonesville VA-K9 Jonesville Methodist Camp Ground Jonesville Methodist Camp Ground.This Camp Ground was established in 1810 as a place for religious services for the Methodists of Lee County on lands given by Elkanah Wynn. In June 1827, Rev. Abraham Still, Daniel Dickenson, George Morris, Evans Peery, Henry Thompson, Elkanah Wynn and James Woodward were appointed trustees; the present auditorium was built in 1827-28. The massive oak columns were hewn by Henry Woodward, David Orr, Robert Wynn and Rev. Joseph Haskew..Virginia Conservation Commission, 1940 US 58 at Rt T-652, west of Jonesville VA-K4 Martin's Station Martin's Station.In March 1769 Joseph Martin led a party of men to the Powell Valley, and attempted to establish a settlement nearby. By that fall they abandoned the site after conflicting with Native Americans. Martin returned here with a party of men in early 1775 and built a fort, known as Martin's Station on the north side of Martin's Creek. The wooden fort contained between five and six cabins built about 30 feet apart with stockades between each building. This site was abandoned in June 1776 during further regional conflicts between settlers and Native Americans..Department of Historic Resources, 2000 Rt. 613, Rose Hill VA-K3 Indian Mound K3 Indian Mound. A short distance north is the Ely Mound, the best-preserved Indian mound in Virginia. It dates to the Late Woodland-Mississippian Period (AD 1200-1650), during which more complex societies and practices evolved, including chiefdoms and religious ceremonies. Often, temples, elite residences, and council buildings stood atop substructure or townhouse mounds such as Ely Mound. Lucien Carr, assistant curator of the Peabody Museum in Boston, led an excavation here in 1877. By proving the connection between this mound and present-day Indians, Carr refuted the then-popular "lost race" hypothesis for Mound Builders in eastern North America..Department of Historic Resources, 2000 US Hwy 58 Bus / Daniel Boone Trail, Rose Hill VA-K7 White Rocks K7 White Rocks.The cliffs to the north were a familiar landmark along the Wilderness Road which was blazed by Daniel Boone in March, 1775, and which was the principal route from Virginia to Kentucky. They are part of the Cumberland Mountains..Virginia Historic Landmarks Commission, 1967 US Hwy 58 Bus / Daniel Boone Trail, Ewing VA-LC001 John Ball 1789-1809 John Ball 1789-1809.Pioneer settler of Lee County, Revolutionary soldier, juror, and surveyor. Helped selected road from Martin's Station to Cumberland Gap. Buried south of here at the mouth of the cave. His wife was "Polly" Yeary. His great grandsdon P.M. Ball (18370-1927) was a confederate soldier..Appr. by the Lee County Board of Supervisors. Sponsored by descendants of John Ball. US Hwy 58 Bus / Daniel Boone Trail, Ewing

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